Do you remember Dan Seals who was known as one half of the soft rock duo England Dan & John Ford Coley? He passed away on March 25, 2009, due to cancer, making it another sad day in the music industry. Today then marks his 10th year death anniversary. Dan Seals is best remembered for this smooth tenor voice which helped him establish a remarkable solo career after his successful partnership with John Ford Coley.

Dan Seals, smooth tenor voice, 10th death anniversary

Photo credit: Dan Seals Official Facebook

Dan Seals’ Origin and Musical Interests

Hailing from Pleasant Grove in West Texas, Seals was born into a family of musicians. His father and two older brothers were all musicians. His father used to play with the legendary country singer Ernest Tubb while his brother Eddie played with Jim Reeves. Seals specialization was playing the string bass.

His parents’ divorce required him to move to Dallas with his mother. While in high school, Seals formed several bands displaying his deep interest in music further. This was the beginning of his popularity as the public got to see more of him and his band performing. He even had the chance to open for the group Led Zeppelin and several others.

Forming England Dan & John Ford Coley

Seals teamed up with John Coley, and they were formed as a duo in 1969. He got his nickname as England Dan due to his extreme love for the Beatles. The duo decided to pursue a softer sound and later become successful in their choice of music. In 1975, they scored their first big hit with the Parker McGee song “I’d Really Love to See You Tonight.” It peaked at No. 2 in the US and reached worldwide popularity with over two million copies sold. Also, it earned the duo a recording contract. England Dan & John Ford Coley would enjoy several Top Ten hits in the US until their split in the 1980s.

Reinventing Himself as a Country-Pop Singer

Dan Seals continued performing even after England Dan & John Ford Coley had broken up. He changed his style to a country sound to stay in tune with what country radio demands. Yet, he maintained his signature soft sound. He went on to score a pair of Top Ten hits on the country chart in 1984 with “(You Bring Out) The Wild Side of Me” and “God Must Be a Cowboy.”

He continued enjoying tremendous success as a country music performer toward the latter half of the ‘80s. His other notable records include the soulful ballad “Everything That Glitters (Is Not Gold),” “One Friend,” and “Meet Me in Montana,” a duet with Marie Osmond. In the ‘90s, Seals scored his two No. 1 hits with “Good Times” and “Love on Arrival.”

Let us remember the soft tenor voice of Dan Seals by listening to some of his hits below.

“Love on Arrival” (1990)

“Good Times” (1990)