The Sweet and Mellow Version of Marty Robbins

Crying Time” is a Buck Owens original hit and definitely one of the most sung songs of the ’60s. The most notable artists who have recorded their own version of the song include American singer-songwriter Ray Price in 1966, and American singer-songwriter, actress and filmmaker Barbra Streisand in 1974. However, most versions of the song were not released and were simply just performed by the artists as part of their concert. An example of this is the performance of “El Paso” country music singer Marty Robbins.

Marty Robbins |Photo Credits: thefamouspeople.com

Regarded as one of the greatest performers of his time, Robbins sang “Crying Time” in one of his concerts in 1978. In contrast with the original introductory tune, Robbins opened the song with a sweet and mellow tone soothing to the ears. In the video, he definitely did justice to the song and for sure made Buck Owens really proud.

Here are the first two stanzas of the song:

Oh, it’s cryin’ time again, you’re gonna leave me
I can see that far away look in your eyes
I can tell by the way you hold me darlin’ Oooh
That it won’t be long before it’s cryin’ time

Now they say that absence makes the heart grow fonder (fonder)
And that tears are only rain to make love grow
Well my love for you could never grow no stronger (stronger)
If I lived to be a hundred years old

Watch the country music legend Marty Robbins cover a Buck Owens original “Crying Time” below:

About the Song, A Buck Owens Original

1964 single, “Crying Time,” was written and originally recorded by country music artist Buck Owens. Owens recorded the original version of this song and released it as the B-side to the 45 single “I’ve Got a Tiger By the Tail” in 1964. However, it failed to reach the music charts. A cover version of “Crying Time” was then recorded by R&B singer Ray Charles, and his version proved to be a hit.

Buck Owens and the Buckaroos |Photo Credits: rollingstone.com

Featuring backing vocals by the Jack Halloran Singers and The Raelettes, the song reached number six on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in February 1966. Charles’ version of the song also peaked at number five on the R&B chart. In addition, it spent three weeks at number one on the easy listening chart. On the other hand, in the UK, the song reached number 50 on the UK Singles Chart.

Moreover, Charles’ version of “Crying Time” won two Grammy Awards in 1967, in the categories Best R&B Recording and Best R&B Solo Performance.

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