The late country music legend George Jones was among the several artists in the genre whose songs somewhat reflect the kind of life they’d lived. He was also one of those who perfectly embodied the tunes on heartbreaks and remorse. Many of his more than 150 hits are lamentations over a lost love, including his best-known hit “He Stopped Loving Her Today.”

Prior to the ‘80s, Jones had already recorded numerous hits and scored No. 1 on the country charts. That’s despite the fact that the singer’s personal life had gone astray at the same time his career was taking off. His addiction to alcohol and his marriage woes had not been hidden from the public. These led ultimately to the palpable decline in his career. Jones tried to make a comeback though in the ‘80s. The earlier part of the decade showed the singer’s ability to score again a few No. 1 songs on the chart. However, it also marked the final decade in Jones’ career as a producer of top country singles.

George Jones holding his guitar and a cigarette.

Photo credit: George Jones Facebook Page

About the Song

Following the release of Jones’ biggest hit, “Still Doin’ Time” was out in 1981. With it, Jones earned his 8th No. 1 song as a solo artist. Penned by John Moffatt and Michael Heeney, the song was released as the first single on his album Still the Same Ole Me. The same year it was released, the song topped the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart while peaking at No. 2 on the Canadian Country Tracks chart. The song enjoyed the top of the chart for one week and stayed on the chart for ten weeks.

“Still Doin’ Time” talks about the story of a man who became a captive of alcohol and he can’t escape from it. This rang true to many of the fans and critics alike. Yet, it came as a surprise to many of them how exceptionally the singer has delivered the song regardless of what he’s going through. The theme is similar to that of a previous hit called “If Drinkin’ Don’t Kill Me (Her Memory Will).” Here, the tune seemed torn from the pages of the singer’s life.

Listen with sympathy to George Jones’ song of anguish below.