Lt. Col. Mark Weber with his eldest son, Matthew (16)

He was diagnosed with cancer the same day his orders to Afghanistan came. It’s beyond treatment and his liver was damaged.

Having prepared his whole family for his impending demise, Lt. Col. Mark Weber honorably sang “Tell My Father” with his son, Matthew. That was on June 14, 2012, the day he gave a speech for the US Army’s 237th birthday.

So as he got up to the stage, he purposely took off his glasses. He didn’t want to see misty eyes. In his speech, he told jokes, talked about humility and the love for country. Finally, he talked about “death.” He told the spectators the whisper he had always heard from it.

“Live, because I am coming.”

Haunting, I know. But, it’s time that you hear him and his son sing.
Try to keep it together until the end of the clip.

Father and Son in “Tell My Father”

On June 2013, Lt. Col. Weber breathed his last at age 41. Sad that he had to go that young. On the flipside, let’s rejoice. A hero went home in heaven to be with the Father.

The story behind the Song

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
July 2, 1863

c/o: North Carolina Digital Collections

Colonel Isaac E. Avery was leading the North Carolina brigade towards the valley. His men and their opponents crossed fires. Due to poor visibility, he didn’t notice a cannonball coming. It knocked him off and he fell to the ground. Dying and alone, he still managed to write a message.

Once found, they gave his friend, Major Samuel McDowell Tate a bloodstained piece of paper. In it, Col. Avery wrote,

“Major: Tell my Father I died with my face to the enemy. I. E. Avery”

To date, the note is in the State Archives of North Carolina.

Do you know other stories about heroism and patriotism? Share them with us and we’ll feature them next. Send it to chanum@countrythangdaily.com