They say, “Time heals all wounds” and the song “More and More” may be proof for this saying.

Nothing can keep you from a happier future than holding on to the past. Experiencing good love gone bad is painful. It does not really matter what the circumstances were, or who was right and who was wrong. The bottom line is that it hurt and that the pain is preventing you from moving forward. If you allow yourself to move forward and let time heal the wound, you will get there someday. As in these lyrics in the song “More and More” that goes:

But oh how I tried to keep you by my side
And oh how I cried the day you said goodbye
Day by day I’m losin’ my blues
More and more I’m forgettin’ ’bout you

In the song, the narrator talks about how he is slowly forgetting his ex. Although he still remembers the feeling when she left him, it does not hurt him as much as it did before.

“More and More” is a song that country singer and composer Merle Kilgore wrote. Recorded by Webb Pierce in 1954, “More and More” spent ten weeks at number one on the country charts and 29 weeks on the chart overall.

In 1983, Charley Pride covered the song. His version peaked at number 7 on US Country and number 3 on Canada Country.

During the opening credits of the 2006 film, The Hills Have Eyes, the director of the movie used “More and More”.

About the Singer

In September 1952, the Grand Ole Opry needed to fill the vacancy left by the letting go of Hank Williams. Pierce was invited to join the cast. After Hank’s loss, he became the face of country music. His popularity ballooned, and every single he released hit the top ten. To name the tracks that reached the top spot were: “There Stands the Glass” (1953), “Slowly” (1954), “More and More” (1954) (a million seller), and “In the Jailhouse Now” (1955). His singles spent 113 weeks at number 1 during the 1950s when he charted 48 singles. Thirty-nine reached the top ten, 26 reached the top four and 13 hit No. 1.