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August 10

Troy Gentry Honors Glen Campbell by Singing the “Rhinestone Cowboy”

Troy Gentry Honors Glen Campbell by Singing the “Rhinestone Cowboy” 1
Photo credit: Facebook/SiriusXM The Highway (Left), David Redfern / Getty Images (Right)

Everybody in the country music is mourning with the passing of a legend and an iconic country superstar, Glen Campbell. A lot are honoring him and they are honoring his memory by the way they only know how, through music.

Troy Gentry is one of those people who are honoring the great Glen Campbell. Gentry is native of Kentucky. He also a part of band that started performing in 1990s. He is one half of Montgomery Gentry. The singer took the social media with satellite radio SiriusXM as the highway to show his deep sense of loss in the wake of Glen Campbell’s death.

With a simple guitar, talent and his great vocal prowess, Gentry unearthed a somber and beautiful version of Glen Campbell’s “Rhinestone Cowboy.” The song is considered the signature Campbell song. Written by Larry Weiss, the song was popularized by Campbell. Weiss wrote and recorded “Rhinestone Cowboy” in 1974, and it appeared on his 20th Century Records album Black and Blue Suite. It did not, however, have much of a commercial impact as a single. In late 1974, Campbell heard the song on the radio, and during a tour of Australia, decided to learn the song. Soon after his return to the United States, Campbell went to Al Coury’s office at Capitol Records, where he was approached about “a great new song” — “Rhinestone Cowboy.” Several music writers noted that Campbell identified with the subject matter of “Rhinestone Cowboy” — survival and making it, particularly when the chips are down — very strongly. As Steven Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic put it, the song is about a veteran artist “who’s aware that he’s more than paid his dues during his career … but is still surviving, and someday, he’ll shine just like a rhinestone cowboy.”

The country music is deeply connected, this video is just a reminder. This video also is a proof how greatly a song from one artist can help shape another. Watch the video below and tell us what you think.


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