After writing the song, George Jones debuted “The Windows Up Above” on Billboard’s Country Chart with it on November 13, 1960. The song stalled at No. 2 in early 1961. Although it didn’t become a No. 1 hit, the song stayed on the chart for over 34 weeks!

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No New Song? Cover Old Songs

“The Window Up Above” re-emerged as Mickey Gilley’s fourth consecutive No. 1 hit. The song was also Mickey Gilley’s fourth consecutive cover. The reason behind Mickey Gilley had covered so many old songs is because Nashville didn’t take him seriously. The writers during that time thought he was a copy of his cousin, Jerry Lee Lewis that’s why they didn’t offer him any of the top new songs of the day. Gilley even claims that his record company didn’t take him seriously.

With no new songs coming, Mickey Gilley revived older songs. “Window Up Above” (originally “The Window Up Above”) is a non-voyeuristic cheating tune that was written in George Jones’ living room in Vidor, Texas. Floyd Cramer did the piano on the original version of the song. On the other hand, Gilley supplied his own version with a Jerry Lee Lewis-style of piano sound for the remake.

The Success of the Song

Back in 1975, Mickey Gilley was tied for material. So, Eddie Kilroy, his producer suggested that he cut a few songs that he had played on stage a few years earlier. “The Window Up Above” was a favorite from his patrons and he performed it often. His studio version of the song emerged as a single. On June 7, 1975, it became his fourth consecutive No. 1 record.

After “Window Up Above,” Mickey Gilley returned to the “FTD approved” themes of “Room Full of Roses” and “I Overlooked An Orchid” with a cover of Eddy Arnold’s 1948 hit, “Bouquet of Roses.” Thereafter, Gilley closed out 1975 with a risqué tune called “Overnight Sensation.”

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