“Slow Burn” by T.G. Sheppard
She’s got that dark hair falling ‘cross her shoulders
There’s not a man alive that wouldn’t want to hold her
And the way she moves, just the way she moves
Well, that’s enough to keep me on a slow burn
Keep me on a slow burn
In her high heals kicking ‘cross the dance floor
She’s more woman than I could ever ask for
Still there’s something in her eyes, in those dark eyes
That’s love and that keeps me on a slow burn
Keeps me on a slow burn
When we touch this fire breaks out
And it rages out of control
And the love we made is so deep, so strong
And when it’s over, even when it’s over
And the flame dies down
It just dies down to a slow burn, slow burn

Do you still remember the very first time you fell in love? Can you describe the clothes she was wearing? Can you tell how she looked as she walked towards you? Can you say the type of woman she was then? Can you vividly explain the feeling? Can you compare it to a “Slow Burn”?

“Slow Burn” is a composition by Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black. The voice behind its recording is American country music artist T. G. Sheppard’s. Released in September 1983, it was the first single and title track from the album Slow Burn.

“Slow Burn” was Sheppard’s 13th number one on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart. For a duration of one week, it was atop the chart as part of a 14-week run within the chart’s Top 40.

Chart Topper

With this single, it broke the string of eight consecutive chart-toppers. Sheppard took advantage of the moment and considered this as a good sign and idea to end his five-year association with Killen. From there, he would move on to another producer of his choice Jim Ed Norman. The new selection had a solid background in pop music. Having played piano on The Eagles’ 1975 hit “Lyin’ Eyes” and arranged material on several of the group’s albums, including “Hotel California” and “Desperado”, he pursued what he wanted.

When Norman started working with T. G. Sheppard, the artist and producer began looking for a type of song that featured the same Eagles style of harmonies and instrumentation. They hit pay dirt when Tommy Rocco and Charlie Black came through with “Slow Burn.”

Although “Slow Burn” was their only #1 single together, Norman and Sheppard proved quite successful in their brief, two-album association. Spurred by the famous tag-line from Clint Eastwood’s movie “Sudden Impact,” T. G. cut “Make My Day” with the actor, reaching #12. Three last Top Ten singles wrapped up Sheppard’s Warner Bros. era: “Somewhere Down The Line,” “One Owner Heart” and “You’re Going Out Of My Mind.” A label change to Columbia brought T. G. a new producer by the name of Rick Hall.

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