After John Travolta’s huge breaks in “Saturday Night Fever”, a music/drama, and “Grease”, a musical, he was named Buford Uan “Bud” Davis in the film  “Urban Cowboy” where he has co-starred with Sissy (Debra Winger). This film revolved around a love-and-hate relationship between the two. Here are several iconic lines, which are sure hit to hopeless romantics:

Sissy:              You a real cowboy?
Bud:                Depends on what you think a real cowboy is?
Sissy:              Can you 2-step?
Bud:                Course.
Sissy:              Wanna prove it?
 
Bud:                I love you , Sissy!
Bud:                I saw Sissy today.
Uncle Bob:   Oh, yeah? What did she say?
Bud:                Well, not very much. She gave me the finger, I gave her the finger. Well, I guess it’s over. I don’t know.
Uncle Bob:   You know Bud? Sometimes even a cowboy’s gotta swallow his pride to hold on to somebody he loves.
 
Bud:                All cowboys ain’t dumb. Some of ’em got smarts real good, like me.

The story was plotted in a honky tonk in Pasadena, Texas, Gilley’s Club. Here, the “Gilley rats,” as they lovingly called themselves, whose evenings and cash was spent through singing, drinking, dancing, and riding the bar’s legendary worldwide mechanical bull is where their lives revolved. At the center of the bar was singer musician Mickey Gilley, who invested in the bar with Sherwood Cryer when his music career had been let up.

 

The Soundtrack Lookin for Love

Irving Azoff, co-producer of the film and also a music impresario, gave Johnny Lee an acting part and requested him to sing one from the tunes, “Lookin’ For Love”, which soon rose to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles Chart. As John Travolta is playing the character of Bud in  “Urban Cowboy”, Johnny is the “original” Urban Cowboy.

“You have to understand, people were coming in all the time promising this, saying that,” he remembers. “I thought Azoff was just somebody else feeding me a line of baloney. I went on drinking my beer. When it actually happened, it freaked me out.”

“I had made quite a few records and was striving to become someone who got to travel around and have everyone get to know my music,” Lee recalls. “When Urban Cowboy came along, my thoughts were, ‘If this is a success, this is really going to slingshot my career into being something successful, and if it isn’t, it’s going to shoot me backwards and knock down everything I’d been working for.’ I didn’t know which way it was going to go, but I thought it was a pretty big deal with John Travolta in it.”