SONG BACKGROUND

Will There Be Any Stars in Our Crown is a hymn by Eliza E. Hewitt and melody by John R. Sweney. Since its release in the late 1800’s, the song became a mainstay in hymnals and one to be frequently picked for special numbers.

The author, Ms. Hewitt, was a high school teacher by profession, but would later give it up due to a spinal malady that afflicted her. By the time she got better, she decided to make herself useful by rendering her service in the church. Having studied literature, she wrote poems and taught Sunday school. She continued her work with children until she reached her ripe age of 69 at 1920 and finally, rested.

Like many hymns, scripture references which inspired the song were on Daniel 12:3, John 14:2, Colossians 1:5, Hebrew 10:34, 1 Peter 5:4, and Revelations 18:16.

Its first commercial release as a song was in 1913 by the Haydn Quartet. Decades later, some country singers took notice of the song’s relevance to people that they also started recording it. Two of them were George Jones in 1965 and Alison Kraus in 1994 in collaboration with the Cox family.

TEXT ANALYSIS

The first stanza is a daydreaming of heaven. Less on the description of a wonderland, the focus was on Jesus’ reward to each one in the form of a crown. While every saint will receive a crown, not all will have the same gems on their crowns. That was the point of the second stanza. The “stars in the crown” pertain to souls won to Christ. If there is something valuable a Christian could offer the King that would be souls whose lives were turned around after trusting in Jesus’ salvation work. Seeing them in glory land will “sweeten your bliss” knowing that you’ve added to God’s “jewels.”

Listen now to the McEntires singing “Will There Be Any Stars in My Crown?”