In the country music industry, Tammy Wynette could be considered as a “country music pioneer”.

“Stand by Your Man” is a song co-written by Tammy Wynette and Billy Sherrill. Originally, Tammy recorded the track. Then in September 1968, it was released as a single in the United States. It was Wynette’s most successful record in her career. Additionally, it is one of the most recorded songs in the history of country music. On CMT’s list of the Top 100 Country Music Songs, “Stand by Your Man” occupied the number one spot.

Tammy Wynette’s Career-Defining Hit

Before the launch of “Stand by Your Man”, many thought that Wynette’s “D-I-V-O-R-C-E” would be her signature song. However, after witnessing how successful the song came to be in America during that time, Sherrill then agreed. “Stand by Your Man” eventually became Tammy Wynette’s career-defining hit.

Even though they released it in late 1968, the song reached number one on the US Country Charts for three weeks. Crossing over to the US Pop Charts, “Stand by Your Man” peaked at number nineteen. It elevated Wynette—then one of many somewhat successful female country recording artists—to superstar status. In 1975, when it was launched in Britain, it reached number one in the UK Singles Chart. Afterward, it became the number one song in the Netherlands. An album of the same name—which was also quite successful—was released in 1968.

At first, she felt indifferent toward the song as it was unlike anything she had ever written before. It had a high note that was difficult for her to sing. She said that, after some time, she developed a liking for the song. She even came to the point where she “could not do a show without it”.

Most Controversial Song

The women’s liberation movement criticized Wynette because they claimed the lyrics were anti-feminist. In 15 minutes, Tammy Wynette and songwriter Billy Sherrill were able to write the song. Yet, the singer spent most of her life defending it. Regardless of all that, the Library of Congress selected “Stand by Your Man” as a 2010 addition to the National Recording Registry. Annually, they select recordings that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

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