“For the Good Times:” Kristofferson’s Song Made Famous by Ray Price

By
February 12, 2019

Life must go on even if we are in the middle of pain, loss, or tragedy. Even though we want to stop time and try to fix things, it’s never possible. Everything will pass by, whether it be sadness, happiness, pain, and even our own life. Time will heal all the wounds of yesterday. This reality about a life we can’t control is clearly seen in Kris Kristofferson's "For the Good Times" for which Ray Price has a cover version.

The Content of “For the Good Times”

The song speaks of a narrator who comforts his lover about their relationship. He wanted her to know that although it is the end for them, life must go on.

Don't look so sad
I know it's over
But life goes on
And this old world
Will keep on turning

He just wanted her to know that he loves her, and soon they'll get over the situation they are in. However, for now, instead of thinking of the time they’ll never be together, he encourages her to live at the moment with him while they still have the chance.

And make believe you love me
One more time
For the good times

Bill Nash to Ray Price

“For the Good Times” was penned by the country singer and songwriter Kris Kristofferson in 1968. The first recording of this song was by Bill Nash. However, it was Price who made the song enter the spotlight. Furthermore, it gave Kristofferson the opportunity to be recognized as a great songwriter.

The Inspiration of the Song

The song was actually based on Kristofferson’s life. He was inspired to write this when he was on a work trip to the Gulf of Mexico.

Chart Performance

Price finally earned another number one on the country chart with his solo recording of the song. In addition, it has also entered the Billboard Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary chart. The last time Price earned a number one on the chart was in 1959 with his song “The Same Old Me.” It took him eleven years before he scored another hit.

Different Versions

Kristofferson’s song has been covered by many artists in and out of the country music scene. Some notable versions of this song were from Lynn Anderson, Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, and Kenny Rogers.