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September 28

Martina McBride & Alan Jackson’s Tribute to Conway & Loretta

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How many of you still remember the song ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man’? It was one of the most epic duets that Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn produced among their countless stage chemistry and shared melody. It has become a fan favorite especially to those who have come from the said states that the song tries to emulate. In response to the brilliance of this song and to the greatness of Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty, country artists, Martina McBride and Alan Jackson tried to immortalize the song by giving it their own rendition. Indeed, ‘Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man’ is given a great rendition it rightfully deserves.

Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man, Conway Twitty, Loretta Lynn

Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn released Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man,  in May 1973 as the first single and title track from the album of the same name. The song was their third number one on the country chart as a duo.

The song details the travails of a couple geographically separated by the Mississippi River. They emphatically pledge that their love is too great to let the wide distance of the river keep them separated. Overcoming alligators and bouts of distraction (the man is often sidetracked by spending time fishing) the man pledges to somehow cross the river while the woman claims she’ll go so far as to swim the distance.

Alan Jackson and Martina McBride definitely did their best to own the song while staying true to its chemistry. While there’s no video of the two performing this song together, you can still listen to the song and judge it for yourself.

Listen to it here:

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Louisiana Woman, Mississippi Man Lyrics

Hey, Louisiana woman, Mississippi man
We get together every time we can.
The Mississippi River can keep us apart
There’s too much love in the Mississippi heart.
Too much love in this Louisiana heart.

See the alligators all a waitin’ nearby
Sooner or later they know I’m gonna try.
When she waves from the bank don’t you know I know
It’s goodbye fishin’ line, see you while ago.
With a Louisiana woman waitin’ on the other side
The Mississippi River don’t look so wide.

Louisiana woman, Mississippi man
We get together every time we can.
The Mississippi River can keep us apart
There’s too much love in the Mississippi heart.
Too much love in this Louisiana heart.


Tags

Alan Jackson, conway twitty, Loretta Lynn, Martina McBride


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