There is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. – John 15:13, NLT

As already established in most published sources, Mahalia Jackson and Martin Luther King Jr. were strong proponents of the Civil War Movement. Strongly convicted that “racism” is evil, they fought hand in hand with King preaching and Jackson singing spirituals before or after the sermon. Hence, the two have forged an unbreakable bond that not even death could sever. To date, their legacies were worth the highlight for today’s feature.

Martin Luther King’s Funeral in Brief

April 4, 1968, marked the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The nation wept for the loss of a great man of God and the historic leader of the Civil Rights Movement. Shortly after his death, King’s funeral was officiated that same month. Many dignitaries and public figures participated in the procession and memorial service. Instead of an automobile, King opted for a wooden wagon pulled by two mules to carry his casket from Ebenezer Baptist Church to Morehouse College.

The memorial service took place in Morehouse. Removing all glamour of the songs, there were singing of hymns, Scripture readings, and brief talks by people dearest to King.  As he had specifically ordered, there wasn’t any mention of his honorary achievements except those deeds when he attempted to what Christ would have done like loving and serving humanity.

Why Dr. King Adored “Precious Lord, Take My Hand

From the pen of Rev. Thomas Dorsey, “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” was reportedly King’s favorite. More than a song for comfort, King see the hymn as a pictorial of complete dependence on God’s Divine intervention over the affairs of humanity. And true to her promise, Mahalia Jackson, much as her dear friend’s death was also difficult for her, stood up and delivered a wailing rendition of “Precious Lord..”

Mahalia Jackson in April 1968- Martin Luther King Funeral
Video Courtesy: blessedover