Born Loretta Lynn Morgan, Lorrie Morgan debuted in the country music scene in 1972. Her first big break as a recording artist was way back in 1989 when she released her single, Trainwreck of Emotion. Also among the most memorable milestones of her career was her debut performance at the esteemed Grand Ole Opry stage.

On December 14, 1973, Lorrie Morgan graced the Opry stage to sing Paper Roses. Her performance marked her official initiation as an Opry member.

However, prior to her very first performance, Morgan had already been exposed to the backstage scenes of the renowned Nashville stage concert. This is because her father, George Morgan, has been a Grand Ole Opry member then for 26 years. Widely recognized for his 1949 hit song, Candy Kisses, George was responsible for introducing his daughter, Lorrie into the Ryman Auditorium.

Lorrie shares that being a musician was her dad’s dream long before it became hers’.

I have all of this because of dad. We’re very blessed to be a musical family here at the Grand Ole Opry.”  Recalling her first performance, Lorrie Morgan disclosed, “My little 13-year-old knees were absolutely knocking. But dad was standing there right beside me with big tears in his eyes, and those people gave me a standing ovation. I thought, ‘This is what I’m doing the rest of my life.'”

In 1975, her father passed away. The cause of his death was a heart attack that occurred after he underwent open heart surgery. This left Morgan, who was only 16 years old then, to take over her father’s band. She led the group through club gigs they attended. In 1977, the group disbanded, and Lorrie became part of the band called Little Roy Wiggins. She wrote songs and became a demo singer and receptionist at Acuff-Rose Music. She was even a featured vocalist on Ralph Emery’s morning TV show on WSM-TV.

“The Opry gave me my start in country music. It’s a place we all need to go from time to time to remember why we’re here and what gave us the opportunity to be here.”

With a powerful and unique vocal and musical style, Morgan was able to release several hits that reflected her passion in her chosen career. Some of her most memorable works are What Part of Now, I Guess You Had To Be There, I Didn’t Know My Own Strength, Something in Red, Except for Monday, A Moment In Time, Half Enough, Misty Blue, Are You Lonesome Tonight and Break it To Me Gently.

The best part about Lorrie Morgan’s development as a country artist is how she never forgets to look back from where she started. She has always considered the Opry stage as her home.