The Country Music Association (CMA) initially established the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1961. They spent six years designing and building the museum before it officially opened. Quickly, the Hall of Fame became a target of Music City locals and tourists, who came to view works of art from their favorite country music artists. Inside, you can also see photos, documents, instruments, clothing, and even vehicle.

The 51-year Life Cycle

In 2000, the Hall of Fame permanently closed its doors at its original site as it prepared to open in swiftly developing downtown Nashville. Earlier, it underwent several expansions due to a rise of items for display contributed by our country music artists. It was necessary to relocate to a much bigger space for that matter.

Eventually, in 2001 the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum officially moved to 222 5th Avenue South, in the heart of Music City, where it still stands. It sustained as one of Nashville’s top tourist destinations.

Yet, even as the Country Music Hall of Fame’s visitors steadily increased, there came disasters. In 2010, a flood shattered the building. More than five feet of water drowned the museum’s mechanical room, and there were damages to the Halls of Fame treasured Ford Theater as well. Happily, the Country Music Hall of Fame soon opened receiving visitors once again and planning another expansion.

In 2014, the museum extended to more than 350,000 square feet. This allowed additional display space, extra event, retail space, and more records and library room as well.

Did You Know?

  • They originally planned it to be temporary.
  • Only three new honorees are inducted annually.
  • Hank Williams was one of the first inductees and it was posthumously. Eddy Arnold, the youngest inductee was not so young. He was  48 years old and still is the youngest inductee ever to receive the honor.
  • Taylor Swift donated $4 million to construct the Taylor Swift Education Center.
  • Not just concerts, but you can also have a wedding ceremony there.
  • There are 466 guitars in the Museum’s collection. These include Mother Maybelle’s 1928 Gibson L5, Lester Flatt’s 1950 Martin D-28, and Emmylou Harris’s 1955 Gibson J-200.
  • There is a collection of 11 handwritten song copies. These include “Jolene” by Dolly Parton, “Gentle on My Mind” by John Hartford, and “Help Me Make It Through the Night” by Kris Kristofferson.

If you want to know events held at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum that marked history, visit our website on https://www.countrythangdaily.com/.