When you hear the song “Fancy” playing, you’ll instantly think of Reba McEntire. Well, you’re not wrong because McEntire did record the song in 1990. But, did you know who was the first artist to record the song?

The Original Version, Bobbie Gentry

In 1969, country singer Bobbie Gentry penned the song “Fancy.” In addition, she recorded the song in the same year as a single and added it soon on her 1970 album Fancy. Gentry’s rendition was released as a single and has scored a spot on the country chart. “Fancy” by Gentry placed at number twenty-six on the Billboard Hot Country chart and number eight on the Adult Contemporary chart. Furthermore, Gentry’s version also scored a position on the Hot 100 chart.

bobbie gentry fancy reba mcentire

Photo Credit: Bobbie Gentry/ Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images/ rollingstone.com

Like her famous and signature song “Ode to Billy Joe”, “Fancy” was first written by Gentry as a short story. Eventually, she turned this incredible and moving short story of hers into a song.

On one of her interview, Gentry said that her song serves as a voice to the liberation and rights of women.

“”Fancy” is my strongest statement for women’s lib, if you really listen to it. I agree wholeheartedly with that movement and all the serious issues that they stand for–equality, equal pay, day care centers, and abortion rights.”

Reba McEntire’s Version

However, even if Gentry was the first to record the song, it was McEntire who made it popular. McEntire recorded “Fancy” in 1990 for her album Rumor Has It. She released the song as a single in 1991, and her version surpassed Gentry’s. “Fancy” by Reba placed at number eight on the Billboard Hot Country chart.

The Music Video

Reba accompanied the song with a music video. She played the main character in the song, Fancy. In the video, Reba returned to the place where she grew up in and flashes of the past began to appear.

Watch the music video here.

CMA Nomination

The music video was nominated for CMA’s Music Video of the Year, but it lost to Garth Brooks’ “The Thunder Rolls.”