Album Review: “Interstate Gospel” by the Pistol Annies

By
November 8, 2018

The Annies

Everybody has been buzzing around the release of 'Interstate Gospel' ever since its announcement. The Pistol Annies are a much-loved trio of super strong women. But, a lot has happened in the last five years. Each of the girls' lives has progressed all in the direction of success.

Angaleena Presley and Ashley Monroe went on and became successful solo artists. They both released some of the best contemporary country albums in the market. Meanwhile, Miranda Lambert soldiered on to become one of the most prominent faces of feminism in country music.

It's safe to say that the Annies made some intense growing, and living, along the way. And it's definitely safe to assume that this was where they drew most of what 'Interstate Gospel' is made up of.

Heartbreak, Soul, and Growth

A story, going through the album, is to be felt in every song. Maybe, the best part about this album is the great lyrics that immerse you. "Interstate Gospel," resonates with strengthening our faith. In the intimate song "5 Acres of Turnips" which somehow instantly transports you into that childhood memory in your backyard.

It is apparent that these ladies poured their heart and soul into their album. The main character of every song is always a woman. Her story is narrated through Presley, Monroe, and Lambert's beautiful harmonies. "Interstate Gospel" shows how women deal with their heartbreak. As well as their life experiences, and how to grow and rise from the ashes.

Interstate Gospel

In a stunningly impressive show of range and versatility, the Pistol Annies deliver on their promise of an excellent album.  There are delightful dollops of different genres that all blended in really well. It sends out a more earthy, grounded vibe that anyone would immediately latch on to.

The Annies deliver on some bluegrass influences on their titular, gospel song "Interstate Gospel." Some Louisiana bayou funk with "Sugar Daddy." And, some slow country ballads such as "When I Was His Wife" and "Best Years of My Life."

Maybe the whole album could be an indulgence of Lambert, Monroe, and Presley's creativity and zest for life. But, they have done so in such a way that it delivered very well and in very nuanced characters. It is as if  we could all say that "oh, we know who she is" or "oh, we know who this one is about."

All in all, the Annies did an amazing job at this one.

Immerse yourself here!