Do you remember the last time Alan Jackson and George Strait joined forces for a performance of the song ‘Murder on Music Row’ aka the songs that lambasts the rise of country pop and the slow killing of traditional country music?

It was during George Strait’s jam-packed ‘Cowboy Rides Away’ concert held in Las Vegas wherein George Strait retired after intense touring around the world. It was indeed a glorious moment to call the attention of the culprit of the country-pop and of course the artists who think that there is too much country in a country music.

Murder on Music Row, George Strait & Alan Jackson

‘Murder on Music Row’ was a 1999 song written by Larry Cordle and Larry Shell. However, Murder on Music Row definitely gained much popularity when George Strait and Alan Jackson decided to record and release a version of the said song the following year in their Latest Greatest Straitiest Hits album.

It then went on to give the brave a song a flash of recognition it never got.  In 2000, ‘Murder on Music Row’ performed by Strait and Jackson received Country Music Association award for Vocal Event of the Year and the following year, it won a CMA Song of the Year award.

On the same fashion that Strait and Jackson sang their hearts out to tell us the domination of country pop, songwriters Cordle and Shell gave their sentiments to CMT about how big business is creating ‘disposable music’:

“Country music stands for something simple, And now we’ve created something that’s so complex and so serious that everybody’s got this furrowed brow. Everybody’s strained today in country music. I don’t think it’s meant to be that way. I don’t think you can make great music when you’re under that kind of pressure. I don’t think you can make lasting music. You’ll make disposable music, and that’s basically what’s being made here now since big business took over country music.”

“I think corporations have homogenized this town, but artists cave too early, too … If you do what the guy with the money tells you to do, you’re not standing up for what you are … I hope these new artists do well. They’d better on the front end. Because five years from now, nobody’s going to remember who they are.”

Watch the killer performance here: